Getting Away Is The Best Thing You Can Do

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Making the decision to go to rehab is incredibly difficult, especially if you share that decision with others. Suddenly it feels like everybody has an opinion about which type of rehab will be best. They all feel the need to “weigh in” on how you should go about your recovery. Their input and “friendly advice” start to drag you down and eventually it can feel like rehab isn’t that great after all.

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This is why, for many addicts, it is a good idea to get away from their current lives if they really want to have a successful recovery. There is no doubt that some people have success in outpatient rehab, but for many, in-patient and individualized treatments have a better chance of success. According to the addiction experts at Crestview Recovery, which offers rehab in Portland, Oregon:

“Many people who enter treatment need to go into the inpatient program once detoxification is complete. While it may seem like a big commitment to enter into a facility for 30 days, it’s of the utmost importance. Those who suffer from the disease of addiction often aren’t safe from themselves, and inpatient treatment is crucial. While you’re in the inpatient level of care, you’ll be able to focus on your recovery without the stressors from the outside world.”

Why is getting away so important?

  1. Distance Helps Perspective

Perhaps the biggest reason to go to inpatient rehab or to a center far enough away to discourage visitors is that it will give you time to reflect on not just your addiction but to the factors in your life that fed it. It’s true that a predisposition to addiction can be passed on through genetics but substance abuse doesn’t happen in a vacuum. Getting away will allow you to see your addiction through fresh eyes and help you better identify your triggers.

  1. Distance Gives Space

We aren’t just talking about literal space. We are talking about emotional space. If you’re ready for rehab, it’s likely that you are also ready for a break from your social and familial circles (and they are likely ready for a break from you). Taking time away from each other allows everyone to focus on their own healing. It gives everyone a vacation (for lack of a better word) from the stress of your addiction, which is important for everyone’s recovery. Plus, it can keep people from feeling pressured to stay tuned into or even responsible for your rehabilitation success.  Make no mistake, your people will play a huge role in your extended recovery, but right now everybody needs some time to themselves.

  1. Distance Aids Focus

The only thing you should be working on right now is your sobriety and your recovery. You don’t need to worry how anybody else is doing or what anybody else thinks. You certainly don’t need to be reminded of responsibilities at home. When you put distance between yourself and your old life, you give yourself permission to focus completely on what you need and want. It isn’t selfish. It’s necessary.

  1. Distance Helps You Make Decisions

It is a sad fact of life that addiction recovery can often result in the severing of ties to social contacts and loved ones. Hopefully not all of them, of course, but addiction hurts everyone and it is important to prepare yourself for that. It is also important to be able to evaluate your social and familial connections for yourself. It is entirely possible that the ties will be severed because you need to sever them. And if you have to see those people all the time while you’re trying to recover, making those breaks is much harder.

  1. Distance Helps You Start Over

You need a fresh start. Some people are able to get that by leaning on their same social circles and family ties. Others need to start completely over somewhere new. Taking time to yourself will help you figure out which option is best for you and, if it is the latter, will give you the best chance of success. You can leave rehab and either build a life close to the rehabilitation center or try somewhere completely new.

Make no mistake about it, your recovery is going to be difficult. If it were easy to shake an addiction, nobody would need rehab in the first place, right? But sometimes rehab isn’t enough. Sometimes you need time and space in addition to rehab before you attempt to confront your pre-recovery life. Time and space will help you cement yourself in your recovery and prevent temptations from causing its failure.

You’ll likely face some push back on the decision to travel for rehab but remember: the only person who has to be okay with this decision is you.

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